Saturday, 5 April 2014

Wellbeing // What does wellbeing mean to you?



In this new series I am asking, "what does wellbeing mean to you?". It's a question with answers as individual and varied as the person being asked.  This first post of the series has been written by Rachel, her answer offers a wonderful perspective on how our own wellbeing affects others around us.

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   So, what does wellbeing mean to me?

For me, the answer to this question has changed over the years. Since having my daughter my whole idea of wellbeing has been challenged and changed. 

Originally wellbeing was taking a bit of time to be 'selfish' and do something that made me happy. The gym, reading a book, painting my nails, a takeaway, a long bath, a holiday, etc.
When I was pregnant well being meant being healthy (good food choices, lots of sleep, rest, etc) and being happy (no stress, sadness, etc). I was very aware that the tiny person growing inside me would eat whatever I ate and feel whatever I felt.

"since having my daughter my whole idea of wellbeing has been challenged and changed."

After she was born I assumed that this would change and my wellbeing would come second to hers. Which, in a way, it does but really I need to be in the best possible condition I can to give her the care she needs and deserves. 

While I was nursing this was easy to apply - I still needed to eat right and rest well to be able to feed her but even after finishing breast feeding I realised that connection was still there. When I am stressed and tired I'm not 'there' for her, she doesn't receive the best possible care as I don't have the energy or spirit to provide it. This, in turn, affects her wellbeing and I've quickly realised that as a Mum my wellbeing is always going to be just as important, if not more so, than hers. 

"if I am at my best emotionally and physically then my daughter receives the best possible care and therefore her wellbeing is entirely linked with my own."

She is 4 years old now and I still find that this still rings true - if I am tired, stressed, hungry and/or running late then I have less patience with her and she isn't given the opportunity to complete tasks independently and with supportive guidance, I can't be as enthusiastic about playing with her, etc.

I hope you can see what I am trying to say - if I am at my best emotionally and physically then my daughter receives the best possible care and therefore her wellbeing is entirely linked with my own.

My view is that 'wellbeing' is about looking after myself so that I can look after my daughter to the high standard I wish to. 

Rachel writes All Natural Aspirations, it's a fantastic resource for green living and non-toxic beauty. Find her on Twitter here and watch her on Youtube here

3 comments:

  1. A great idea for a post - I absolutely agree that your wellbeing is crucial. I'm really good at looking after myself(!), as Rachel implies, happy mum, happy child, happy house!

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  2. Can't wait to read more from the series, and loved reading what Rachel had to say - lovely post :) x

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  3. Fantastic post!! While I haven't discovered the joys of motherhood yet haha, I understand Rachel completely :) It's funny how our understanding of wellbeing changes as we grow. xx

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